Frequently asked questions

  1. Can Business Events Canada send a letter to Immigration inviting my foreign delegates to attend our convention in Canada, so that they can get a visa?
  2. Can United Airlines and Air Canada share group discounts?
  3. Do my delegates need a passport to attend a convention in Canada?
  4. What are Canada's National Holidays?
  5. What if I have an emergency while I am traveling in Canada?
  6. What currency is accepted in Canada?
  7. What is current exchange rate and how do I calculate American dollars to Canadian dollars?
  8. What is the electric current in Canada?
  9. What kind of tips do I give in Canada?
  10. What taxes are applicable in Canada?
  11. What is the weather like in Canada?
  12. I have a complaint about a tourism operator or airline; who do I contact?
  13. Can you send me travel information (on boating, ski areas, camps, resorts, festivals, etc) about Canada?
  14. Am I permitted to bring firearms into Canada for hunting purposes?
  15. How do I obtain a hunting license for my hunting trip in Canada?
  16. Is gas expensive in Canada?
  17. Can I use a radar detector in Canada?
  18. Do you have any pins, flags, maps, posters, etc. to send me?
  19. What does Destination Canada do?
  20. How can I remove my name from your mailing list?
  21. What if I have some questions/comments about your website?

 

Can Business Events Canada send a letter to Immigration inviting my foreign delegates to attend our convention in Canada, so that they can get a visa?

No, the letter must come from a Canadian representative of that company or organization. We can refer you to the country's immigration website to help get you started.

 

Can United Airlines and Air Canada share group discounts?

Yes.

 

Do my delegates need a passport to attend a convention in Canada?

Effective June 1, 2009, U.S. citizens returning home from Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean or Bermuda, by land or sea, are required to present one of the following travel documents: U.S. Passport, U.S. Passport Card, Enhanced Driver's License, or Trusted Traveller Program Cards, such as NEXUS, SENTRI, or FAST. listed below.

 

What are Canada's National Holidays?

Statutory holidays vary by province and territory. There are five statutory holidays that apply to all jurisdictions: New Year's Day, Good Friday (or Easter Monday in Québec), Canada Day (Memorial Day in Newfoundland), Labour Day, and Christmas Day. Most jurisdictions also celebrate, Boxing Day, Victoria Day (3rd Monday in May), Thanksgiving Day (2nd Monday in October) and Remembrance Day (November 11).  Quebec celebrates Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day (June 24). The Yukon celebrates Discovery Day (3rd Monday in August). Most other provinces enjoy a civic holiday on the first Monday in August.

 

What if I have an emergency while I am traveling in Canada?

Most Canadian cities have 911 emergency services. If this is unavailable dial 0 for the operator and ask for the police, ambulance or fire service. Emergency calls from public pay phones are free.

 

What currency is accepted in Canada?

The currency in Canada is the Canadian dollar and cent. All major credit cards are accepted. Automatic tellers accept worldwide bank cards for cash withdrawals for a small fee ($1 - $3). Converting cash at banks, airports - US cash accepted at some stores at a flat exchange rate.

 

What is current exchange rate and how do I calculate American dollars to Canadian dollars?

Visit our Currency Converter for a handy tool to help you convert funds.

 

What is the electric current in Canada?

120 Volts 60Hz, which is identical to the U.S. voltage. Adaptors are generally required for other international electrical devices.

 

What kind of tips do I give in Canada?

Tips or service charges are not usually added to the bill in Canada. In general a tip of 15-20% of the total amount should be given. It's up to you how much you give bellhops, doormen, porters and other staff at hotels, airports and railway stations, but generally $1 and up per item is standard. Tipping your server both at the bar and at the table is common practice in Canadian bars and nightclubs.

 

What taxes are applicable in Canada?

Like the national sales tax or the value-added tax paid by consumers in other countries, Canada's 5% goods and services tax (GST) is a national value-added tax charged by businesses that are GST/HST registrants on most property and services supplied in Canada, and imposed on most importations of property and services into Canada. The harmonized sales tax (HST) which includes the GST, applies in the participating provinces at the following rates: 13% in Ontario, New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador, 14% in Prince Edward Island and 15% in Nova Scotia. Alberta is the only province where PST is not levied. The GST applies in the rest of Canada at the rate of 5%.

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) administers the Foreign Convention and Tour Incentive Program (FCTIP), which is a program designed to attract foreign conventions and tour groups to Canada.

Under the FCTIP, sponsors and unregistered organizers of a foreign convention may be able to claim a rebate for the GST/HST paid on a convention facility and related convention supplies. Unregistered non-resident exhibitors attending domestic or foreign conventions may be able to claim a rebate of the GST/HST paid on convention space and related convention supplies.

Under the same program, non-resident businesses and organizations, including tour operators, may be able to claim a rebate for the GST/HST paid on eligible tour packages. Non-resident tour operators may also be able to claim a rebate for the GST/HST paid on short-term or camping accommodation purchased and then sold in an eligible tour package.

The CRA encourages foreign organizations to contact the CRA in advance of holding an event in Canada to ensure eligibility for a rebate. A written request for a ruling on a specific fact situation may be submitted to a GST/HST Rulings office as outlined in GST/HST Memorandum 1.4, Excise and GST/HST Rulings and Interpretations Service, which can be found on the CRA website at www.cra.gc.ca/E/pub/gm/1-4/1-4-e.pdf.

For more information on FCTIP and copies of the relevant rebate forms, please refer to Guide RC4160, Rebate for Tour Packages, Foreign Conventions, and Non-Resident Exhibitor Purchases, which is available on the CRA website at www.cra-arc.gc.ca/visitors/.

 

What is the weather like in Canada?

Canada is vast and its climate varies greatly. The southernmost part of Canada is on the same latitude as the south of France, with the northern most part extending deep into the Arctic. Canada enjoys four distinct seasons throughout the year and each brings a unique experience. For information about Canada's climate and detail local weather forecasts, visit Environment Canada's Weather Office (http://www.weatheroffice.gc.ca/)

 

I have a complaint about a tourism operator or airline; who do I contact?

As a first step, bring your concerns to the attention of the owner, manager or customer service department of the tourism company or airline to see if your complaint can be resolved to your satisfaction. If you are dissatisfied with the result, the Better Business Bureau (BBB) accepts complaints from consumers who feel a company has treated them unfairly. Visit the BBB website to find out if your complaint is one the BBB can handle.
 
If your complaint involves a particular air carrier, and direct contact with an airline representative does not resolve your concern, the Canadian Transportation Agency can assist with resolving your complaint through its Informal Air Travel Complaints website.

 

Can you send me travel information (on boating, ski areas, camps, resorts, festivals, etc) about Canada?

Destination Canada doesn't handle these types of requests. But you can probably find what you are looking for at the "Canada keep exploring" website. For general information about travel to Canada (passports, ID, visas, travel documents for children, traveling with prescription medication, etc.), see Things to Know at the "Canada keep exploring" website.

 

Am I permitted to bring firearms into Canada for hunting purposes?

As a rule, weapons are not allowed into Canada. However, with the proper documentation to prove its use, you may bring a non-restricted firearm such as a hunting rifle or shotgun if it is being used for in-season hunting, for competition purposes, in-transit movement or as protection against wildlife in remote areas of Canada. Visitors cannot, under any circumstances, bring in prohibited firearms. Visit the Canada Border Services Agency website for more details about the import of firearms and ammunition. You may also want to visit the Canadian Firearms Program website for the latest news and updates.

 

How do I obtain a hunting license for my hunting trip in Canada?

Hunting regulations and licensing fees in Canada vary by province and territory. Hunting licenses for non-residents of Canada are available at a variety of authorized locations, including hunting lodges/outfitters and sporting goods, hardware and convenience stores; some can only be purchased at Government Agent offices. For information on license requirements and costs as well as directories of authorized license issuers, click on you're the area where you plan to visit.

British Columbia hunting
Alberta hunting
Saskatchewan hunting
Manitoba hunting
Ontario hunting
Quebec hunting
New Brunswick hunting
Nova Scotia hunting
Prince Edward Island hunting
Newfoundland & Labrador hunting
Yukon hunting
Northwest Territories hunting
Nunavut hunting

 

Is gas expensive in Canada?

Retail gasoline prices in Canada are the second lowest in the industrialized world. Only the United States has lower average gasoline prices than Canada. The difference between retail fuel prices in the US and Canada is largely based on taxes. Canadian taxes account for a large percent of the retail prices of gasoline, making gas in Canada more expensive than in some US states. Canadian gas prices, however, are still lower than the prices found in Europe. Canadian gas is charged by the liter. You can convert liters to gallons here

 

Can I use a radar detector in Canada?

Possessing a radar detector is illegal in Newfoundland & Labrador, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Yukon and the Northwest Territories. Police may confiscate the detector and impose substantial fines, even if the device isn't being operated. Radar detectors are legal in British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan.

 

Do you have any pins, flags, maps, posters, etc. to send me?

Unfortunately, Destination Canada does not have any souvenir pins, maps or posters available for distribution to visitors. For information about obtaining brochures or other visitor materials, please visit the official tourism websites of the provinces or territories where you plan to visit.

 

What does Destination Canada do?

Destination Canada is Canada's national tourism marketing organization. Our vision is inspiring the world to explore Canada. With our partners in the tourism industry and the governments of Canada, the provinces and the territories, we advertise and market Canada in 11 countries around the world, conduct industry research and studies, and promote product and industry development.

 

How can I remove my name from your mailing list?

Business Events Canada is committed to respecting your personal privacy. If you no longer want to receive marketing or communication by e-mail, simply click the unsubscribe link from the bottom of any of the e-newsletter you receive from us.

 

What if I have some questions/comments about your website?

Business Events Canada is always eager for your feedback and input. Please send your questions/comments to:

Business Events Canada
800 - 1045 Howe Street
Vancouver, BC
V6Z 2A9
Canada

Return to top